MozillaZine

Full Article Attached Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

Tuesday August 10th, 1999

Eric Murphy, MozillaZine member and regular contributor in our forums, has written an opinion piece on the Netscape/mozilla.org situation. To read it, click Full Article below.


#1 Dang right!!

by jedbro

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 7:17 PM

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Eric: Totally with you on this one!

With all the work that MOZILLA has done on the gecko engine, it desirves a fair boost into the market.

Weather it hit's or not, (I'm positive it will) they still desirve at least that much for what they have done!

I really think Communicator 5 can be a turn around point for Netscape. Not to mention a big boost in Stock value for AOL!!

BUT, this will only happen if they do what you have noted above! IE sucks, and yet is big now because microsoft has always been good at marketing there software. Even when version 3.0/crap was out, they still did a good job of advertising.. Netscape need to follow them in that ONE ascpect.

I'm sure M will be popular with software vendors who want there programs "Web ready".

Hands getting shaking just thinking about the possibilities =)

#2 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by ERICmurphy <murphye@gmail.com>

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 7:37 PM

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Add to my little list a revamped Netcenter that is Communicator 5 enhanced. It has to be extra cool, and show off the software's capabilites.

Be a trend setter.

#3 2 things

by fresh <icos@arez.com>

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 8:33 PM

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2 things:

1) Don't forget that AOL should spend less money on mailing those damn floppies, and more in R&D (ie, hire more programmers for mozilla.org)

2) I'd be happy to work for you, too, Netscape! I'll do ANYTHING so long as I get an @netscape.com email :)

Seriously, I already submit bug reports 3 times a week, test all daily builds, and write good press coverage for you guys. Whadayasay?

-andrew <icos@digitalchat.net>

#27 2 things

by zaw <zaw@netscape.net>

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 10:39 AM

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I work in Slicon Valley and talked to peoples who work @ netscape before.

Netscape seems to be pretty cool place to work, I heard they can bring pet to work in somearea, I think Kids are also allowed. You get a webspace a peoples.netscape.com cool enought for me.

Better then this place where i writing this message from.

#4 hahahahahhahahahahahahahahahahahahahahhaha

by eduar09

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 8:36 PM

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Okay this article seems to forget that Netscape doesn't make money directly from the browser. These ideas would be great if Netscape had money to burn, but there is a finite amount of money the browser drives into Netscape. Promoting Netscape 5 in the same way this article talks about is completly impossible.. assuming Netsape intends to stay in buisness.

But the article was good for a good laugh.

#5 RE:hahahahahhahahahahahahahahahahahahahahhaha

by Jake <jake@bugzilla.org>

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 8:54 PM

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Like IE brings in any money, it's also free... but look how much money Microsoft is spending on defending their "freedom to inovate" (or monoplize, I can never keep those two strait [and I'm not the only one]). Some things are obviously more feesable than others, such as AOL dropping IE and embracing other OS's (after all, their already doing that one). I think WE can help with some of the other ones (such as spreading the word about standards compliance [maybe make a web page the "looks best with ANY standards compliant browser"] and getting ISP's to allow a choice [just call & complain (everybody LOVES complainers... :O)]). Also, if AOL drops IE, it will help solve some of the distribution problems 'cause everybody in America will have at least 3 CD's with Mozilla on it.

#6 Typo City

by Jake <jake@bugzilla.org>

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 8:55 PM

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I guess I should really be in bed right now... I can't seem to type worth ANYTHING!!!

#7 Agreed

by Anon

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 9:01 PM

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Some of the suggestions in this article are a bit over the edge. However, most are not all that unfeasable in moderation.

You could easily include Netscape 5 onto every AOL cd/diskette that goes out. And, while I do get a bit annoyed when I receive an AOL diskette or cd in the mail without having asked for it, I do think you should keep sending them out in magazines and by request for free.

#9 "Open-source" Marketing

by BehrQattz <brandon@wave22.com>

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 9:58 PM

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I wonder if an "open-source" marketing group could work. Perhaps some members from each company utilizing the Gecko engine, with a pool of money for the marketing effort. Create a "Look for the Gecko Inside" campaign (yeah, I know I stole that from Intel). If the public is keenly aware of Gecko, it could make a real shift in browser usage. With the right effort, any non-Gecko browser (*cough* IE *cough*) could start seeming like an IDT x86 chip next to an Intel Pent-III.

I don't even know if an "open-source" marketing group could work. But it's an idea worth considering, I think.

#10 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by Waldo

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 10:13 PM

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One advantage of an "open-source" style marketing campaign is that supporters can specialize within their particular market, place of employment, etc, targeting how Mozilla will work best in their industry or community.

(For example, maybe they could get a mozilla ad in the company newsletter or something, or write a letter to the editor about this great experiment. But the ads should be pre-made, or at least icons and basic looks for ads could be, so that they are all "on message" for the overall theme of Mozilla's campaign.)

AOL/Netscape is definately going to have to help, or at least let everyone know what their plans are for supporting Mozilla when it comes out.

It seems that without AOL/Netscape, it's kinda like a grass-roots political campaign.

In other news, I thought this was interesting: <http://www.appleinsider.c…ernet-explorer-five.shtml>

It's a link to a site describing IE 5.0 for Mac. The the new rendering engine is supposed to support:

greater support for HTML 4.0 Cascading Style Sheets 1.0/2.0, DOM 1.0/Win32, XML JavaScript 5.0.

The latest tests had it running faster than Mozilla build 8, with a caveat that neither engine was optimized.

W

#11 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by Anon

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 11:02 PM

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@Home, big guy among cable internet providers, distributes strictly Netscape (a customised version), or at least they did when I first signed up. And that's a big step in the right direction :)

Now we just need phone companies to pack it with ISDN and xDSL, then hit Mindspring, and that's a huge chunk of the browser market! :)

#12 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by ERICmurphy <murphye@gmail.com>

Tuesday August 10th, 1999 11:08 PM

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They give you a choice or the two now. Either way it is a crappy customized version. I never installed it, but told them I wanted Netscape, just to "bring up the average".

Eric

#13 Market Share, Who Cares

by Anon

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 1:23 AM

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1. Why does anyone (at least those not directly connected to Netscape) care if Netcape/AOL is commercially successful? (Believe me, people are hired at Netscape/AOL to do just that -- in fact, they do that eight hours a day, and put a great deal more effort into it than any person on the 'net can.)

2. Why does anyone (same qualification as above) care what market share Navigator 5 gets? Do you really want to see a Netscape monopoly any more than you want to see a Microsoft monopoly? Competition is *good* -- Opera, Microsoft, and Netscape force each other to *innovate* (or just implement) to stay in business.

Why can't we settle for an excellent piece of *free* *open* software?

#34 Market Share, Who Cares

by Tekhir

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 5:25 PM

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If that IE market share is correct, 75%, then NS is going to be in a uphill battle. As long as the market share is evenly divided between the big names everything is good because standards win. But if one player becomes too powerful then kiss standards goodbye.

BTW I don't think IE has 75%. Because NS has about 30% and who knows about Opera and Lynx, but they should be about 10% or more.

#14 Other Countries

by danielhill <danielhill@hotmail.com>

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 1:28 AM

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Netscape seem to only market in the US. Here in Australia, I believe market share for netscape is BELOW 20%. I dont have official numbers, but a friend of mine works for a large ISP, and they say thats about right. The three big Australian ISP's (Telstra, OzEmail and AOL Australia) all give out IE, and refuse to give support to Netscape users.

The most poular Australian site is NineMSN, and they actively encourage the use of IE. Most large sites use NT and IIS for servers, and again they encourage Microsoft products.

I believe the UK, Europe and Japan are similar. MS have actually invested in international customers. Netscape don't give a rats arse. Go to <http://www.netscape.com> and click on "Australia" down the bottom. Absolutely shocking. Try to add Australian news to MyNetscape. Good luck.

Now go to ninemsn.com.au, or <http://www.excite.com.au> and spot the difference. It may not be the browser, but it WILL affect the marketing of the browser. NSCP better get their fingers out.

dan

#15 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by Waldo

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 1:37 AM

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1. I guess I care kinda for the same reason I want my local baseball team to win. It's not so much AOL/Netscape's commercial success I care about, but the idea that this open-source project, this grand experiment, should succeed. Because in the long run, a high-profile open-source victory is going to encourage more open-source development, and that's likely to result in more free/good software for everyone. So maybe it's self-interest.

2. A Mozilla "monopoly" would be a victory for open standards, free software, and philosophically a victory for "the people" -- A closed microsoft-style monopoly leads to strangleholds on protocols which leads to a crappy, balklandized Internet. Mozilla's victory will allow different OS's, different platforms, different applications, etc. all to share a free, common, _open_ means of processing and rendering documents-- a system which will surely find itself used in more than just web browsers and can be adapted by the public for all sorts of purposes. In the long run that's great for everyone.

W

#28 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by Anon

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 12:26 PM

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"A Mozilla "monopoly" would be a victory for open standards, free software, and philosophically a victory for "the people""

A monopoly is *never* a victory -- its all about freedom of choice for the consumer (and there being more than one viable choce).

Mozilla will never have a monopoly -- and I'm perfectly happy with that.

#16 Education area

by briank

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 3:19 AM

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The point about aiming at schools is a very good point. A software kit for education. Composer would be a very useful, easy to use tool for creating web pages. Young people's introduction to the Web will be with Netscape. I firmly believe that what you learn with will stick with you for a long time.

All of this would be free of course!

#17 If you want Mozilla to succeed

by Luddite

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 6:18 AM

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You need developers who are willing to write and create compelling content without using kludges to support other browsers.

In other words, you need developers to write HTML/CSS/DOM that is 100% standards compliant. Put a link to download Mozilla on the page and state that it'll be needed to view the site as it was intended.

That seems to be the way Netscape flourished and got users to upgrade until IE3/4 came along in the major OS.

Unfortunately, I don't see this happening, even in controlled environments like corporate Intranets.

#18 Mozilla

by stoecker <stoecker@mindrevolution.de>

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 6:32 AM

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An open source marketing group seems like a great idea. But there is much more to consider besides sending out free cds.

This group should be organized in a maybe 3 level structure. First the "International Coordination Group", where the local "Country Groups" which work under. Last, the "Targeting Groups" who take care of such areas as "Consumer", "Business", OEMs/ISPs/VARs/whatever.

I think that only with a strong and tough campaign it is possible to get back market share. There is more to do that just have a better browser/mailer.

I would like to form such a "Country Group" for Germany - but as I mentioned, this has to be a globally coordinated thing. We should not start to raise local activities if there is no international background.

Anyone interested in a more concrete discussion acout this topic? If not - what's wrong about my idea? I'd really like to know what you others think.

#21 Mozilla

by ERICmurphy <murphye@gmail.com>

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 9:03 AM

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The biggest problem I see about open source marketing is money.

Let's take Mozilla for example:

No significant funds coming in, therefore no significant funds to be used for marketing. I doubt Netscape would help fund such a thing.

However, there are probably some things that can be done by such a group that require no cash. Those are few and far between however, and their impact would probably not be worth the trouble.

I see marketing as an all or nothing type of thing.

--Idea

Funds could be obtained by bundling deals with Mozilla software, and maybe even ads strategically placed within the software itself. Also, have any of you guys seen the Fit used at Carlos O'Kelly's TV ad? I call it bundle advertising, and it might be another way to advertise for cheap. There are ways, but it would be a tough road to go.

Also, I am not very sure if the Mozilla name is very marketable.

P.S. I like the focus groups idea.

#19 my thoughts

by beg <beg1@netscape.net>

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 8:31 AM

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First off, i think that survey that say that Netscape has 25% market share is false, but then again what do i know?

I also made a site a long time ago on this subject: <http://members.xoom.com/beg1/netcenterideas.html>

>>>Second, Netscape needs to work the ISPs. I know they have been poor about this. At least convince the ISPs to let the users choose on signup. Show them the customizable chrome - that will get their attention.<<<

Also, needs to get other OEMs to pre-install Netscape. (Dell mainly!!)

>>>Fourth, Netscape needs to be more like Apple and work the education markets. School will take most any deal they can get. I am sure Microsoft is not giving them that great of one. Example: Throw in quality software training kits, show them how to use all the software, like the Editor. Show them how to make web pages and upload them. Show them how to give students their own e-mail address and access it in Communicator easily (roaming). Educators would be tickled to death by this stuff. Maybe even send actual people out to see them. Wow!<<<

You dont understand how big this can be. If netscape gets schools to pre-install Netscape5, then the default site could be Netcenter. Although, most of the time, the default site becomes the school web site.

Netscape could work with schools and show them how to use Netscape as you said, but also tell the schools that Netcenter will give all the students free email accounts and other cool features. The tearchers could talk and make meetings over Netcenter instead of telling them or sending a peace of paper. Or say if the head office wants to see a student, then the main office could just send an ICQ right to that tearch and tell her.

>>>Fifth, People should be able to get Communicator mailed to them on CD for cheap. No questions asked.<<<

Also, put CDs in BlockBuster, too! These CDs could have little presention on all the cool features Netscape browser has and how it integrates with the Netcenter portal and allows people to email, ect.

integrate ICQ with Communicator.

Netscape ICQ. I like the ring to it?? I think it would help brand Netscape, cause so many international users.

One more thing, integrate all of AOL's other web propertiies with Netcenter. Like Shoutcast.com, Spinner.com, ect...

These would fit nicly with Netcenter. Remeber, Netscape makes money from Netcenter, so they must tie Comminucator w/ their portal.

#20 AOL bundled in absolutely everything

by mozineAdmin

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 9:02 AM

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Mozilla has the best distribution mechanism available, AOL's CD carpet-bombing. I recently received a package from Performance Bikes (from an online order), and an AOL 4.0 CD was in the box! That's going to be a *huge* benefit for Mozilla.

#22 AOL bundled in absolutely everything

by ERICmurphy <murphye@gmail.com>

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 9:08 AM

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If AOL would agree to make half the CD label (or anything really) Communicator 5 specific, people would be much more aware that this CD is much more than AOL software.

--Eric

#23 AOL bundled in absolutely everything

by ERICmurphy <murphye@gmail.com>

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 9:09 AM

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If AOL would agree to make half the CD label (or anything really) Communicator 5 specific, people would be much more aware that this CD is much more than AOL software.

--Eric

#24 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by ERICmurphy <murphye@gmail.com>

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 9:10 AM

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I hit reload...double post.

#25 Stick with it

by veliath

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 9:19 AM

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My opinion on the whole thing is that netscape should just keep trying as hard as it can to get a nce pretty browser out as fast as possible.

It doesn't matter if there are no outside developers. What makes OSS superior is the fact that people can see/verify what they are running.

I think its sort of like the linux thing - linus tried to get as many usable kernels out as he could in as short a time as possible. Its what gets people interestd and keeps them interested.

So I would think if basic functionality is in, to work on the UI and the exterior and work on optimizing and pruning later.

veliath

#26 The good, the bad, and...

by wheezy

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 10:18 AM

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Eric, I'd like to thank you for what I'd call a pretty good article. I can't say I agree with all your points (which I'll elaborate on) but regardless, the way in which you got your ideas out on the table is a model for everybody to follow. As everybody knows, as the mozilla 5 browser nears completion, we're nearing a big turning point where input and ideas are absolutely crucial.

That having been said, there are some points of your piece I'd like to pick at, if you don't mind :)

1. You tout the customizable chrome as a big selling point for the browser. I agree in part, but this can't be done blindly. A view I take on the browser in general is, mozilla is so incredibly featureful that marketing can choose different features to push to different organizations. And a case in point is the chrome: when you say that ISPs should be shown the chrome, they need to be told explicitly that they can distribute their own "version" of the mozilla browser with their unique branding, and even their own default start page (which doesn't even have anything to do with chrome). Even if you don't know anything about business, you should know that branding is at the core. And even if you don't know anything about browser users, you should know that a staggering amount of them never change their default start page (which is partially how Netcenter got to be one of the world's highest traffic sites).

2. The public IS as dumb as you think, and dumber. If they can't figure out how to customize their start page, they will assuredly get confused by customizing their browser's look and feel. Again, intelligent marketing is key. Advertise the chrome to users of WinAmp, for example, who are accustomed to the idea of skins. The thing you want to advertise to the majority of the public is not any particular feature, but abstract concepts like "speed" and "reliability"; but even then, marketing to the public won't account for much. Which brings me to...

3. It's business-to-business deals that will be the majority of mozilla's success. You're definitely on to something when you say they should work the education channels and businesses in general. These are the folks you can target, and enamour them of different technical aspects of the browser. Target web design houses, with brochures about CSS compliance and rendering performance. Target large web "communities" such as geocities. Target web application builders. Target everybody, and sell different parts of the browser to them. Even if they don't "buy" the browser in a standard sense, product placement is also very desirable. Hell, sell the thing to movie makers -- everybody wants their computer to look like the ones on the big screen.

4. Finally, some points you have made are already obviously been taken into consideration. AOL is obviously dumping IE for mozilla. Embracing alternate operating systems has certainly been done (XP, anyone?). These are huge steps in the right direction.

Anyway, thanks again, Eric, for an inspirational piece. I sincerely hope more people out there weigh in with their input and ideas. I don't know how Netscape likes the idea of open-source marketing, but I'm sure most of us have at least one good idea to help this cause.

#29 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by Waldo

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 2:24 PM

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I put "monopoly" in quotes to contrast it with a Microsoft monopoly-- not that I was advocating a literal monopoly by Mozilla or anyone.

Obviously people should have choice. But I'd like to see where Mozilla is popular enough to keep anyone else from getting enough of an edge that THEY have a de facto monopoly of standards, if that makes sense.

In other words, in order for the web to work, you need standards. I'd rather see those standards established by a free open-source system than a private, closed one.

W

#30 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by Anon

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 4:19 PM

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Currently users switch to IE(4/5) because somehow they feel that Mozilla(5) and Communicator(4) has been put off to the side.

AOL/Netscape should learn something from Microsoft- give every single bug release as a new x.0 version. Communicator 4.5 should have been named 5.0 in the first place. That way people won't feel that IE is "newer" or "more cutting edge".

Finally, IE/Win98 is tough to beat. However, knowing that users don't use Active Desktops anyway, there are lots of things that Mozilla can do to make it "integrated". For example, Mozilla can make itself "load at startup" to make users feel that it loads like Notepad. They can let Mozilla browse folders. And that would nullify the Win/IE integration experience.

On the distribution side, AOL should put Netscape on every AOL disk. Make Mozilla "an option" for AOL. Ask ISPs to make Mozilla "an option", perhaps giving away old versions of server softwares for free.

#31 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by Anon

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 4:19 PM

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Currently users switch to IE(4/5) because somehow they feel that Mozilla(5) and Communicator(4) has been put off to the side.

AOL/Netscape should learn something from Microsoft- give every single bug release as a new x.0 version. Communicator 4.5 should have been named 5.0 in the first place. That way people won't feel that IE is "newer" or "more cutting edge".

Finally, IE/Win98 is tough to beat. However, knowing that users don't use Active Desktops anyway, there are lots of things that Mozilla can do to make it "integrated". For example, Mozilla can make itself "load at startup" to make users feel that it loads like Notepad. They can let Mozilla browse folders. And that would nullify the Win/IE integration experience.

On the distribution side, AOL should put Netscape on every AOL disk. Make Mozilla "an option" for AOL. Ask ISPs to make Mozilla "an option", perhaps giving away old versions of server softwares for free.

by <gordoncy@netscape.net>

#32 Reader Opinion: Mozilla Needs Netscape

by zontar

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 4:37 PM

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Thanks, Eric. Some good ideas there.

We must leave no stone unturned in our efforts to spread the word on behalf of Mozilla.

#33 IE5 is fast

by Anon

Wednesday August 11th, 1999 4:42 PM

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I use both Netscape 4.6 and IE5 in Windows NT. From my experience (I often download the daily builds of Mozilla 5 and always the milestones) IE5 is still the fastest browser I've seen. It loads quickly and renders pages very well (with superb standards support, although not 100%). I'd like to see Mozilla win the browser war, but it may not be possible on Windows. I definately agree with focusing on other operating systems. And the school idea is great. =)

#35 Roaming profiles / International stuff

by ckeene

Thursday August 12th, 1999 2:44 AM

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Good article.

Point One, We would love to use Netscape, but can't due to it's lack of support for NT roaming profiles. Netscape 3 does, 4 doesn't. If 5 supports this, the we will use this as our standard browser, if we find that user settings are still not carried with the user then we will have to stick with IE :(

Point 2, I agree with dan about the international stuff. Just look at Netcenter, "get your local News", click on it and you get a list of USA states. When you install Netscape your bookmarks are filled with content that is only of use to those inn the states (USA TV listings etc). I think this needs to change.

Chris Keene.

#36 Roaming profiles / International stuff

by ERICmurphy <murphye@gmail.com>

Thursday August 12th, 1999 8:52 AM

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I know at my university there are NT machines with Communicator that are set up for roaming, and this is tied with NT for account access.

Easy migration? Probably not. Maybe Communicator 5 can have some tools to ease this?

--Eric

#37 You people just don't get it

by Anon

Thursday August 12th, 1999 4:10 PM

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No matter how many times it fails, there will always be some idiot out there who will wave the cross platform flag as the saviour from Microsoft. The masses do not care about BeOS or Linux because it is harder to use. The masses do not like Java because all they get is applications that run slower. The masses don't give a damn about browsers on CD's when the computer they buy already has IE preinstalled.

What people want is a vastly simplified computing experience. This cannot be done without a new first developing a new hardware architecture.

#38 You people just don't get it

by Anon

Thursday August 12th, 1999 5:04 PM

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If you have used BeOS, you would not say that is harder to use. It's not even in the same league as windows, let alone Linux on useability. Just because it is different, doesn't mean that it is harder. A mildly intelligent 4 year-old could install BeOS, and I am not exagerating there. Put in the CD, Turn on the computer, hit enter a couple of times and you are done. The video and sound cards are even set up and ready by then. Don't dis it 'till you try it.

#39 No software for BeOS

by Anon

Thursday August 12th, 1999 6:30 PM

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Then there is little software available for BeOS. Sorry folks, but lets stop reinventing the past

#40 There is too.

by ERICmurphy <murphye@gmail.com>

Thursday August 12th, 1999 7:32 PM

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There is a lot of great software for the BeOS, just not from BIG name companies. Most of the time, this software is BETTER than the bloatware available on Windows, Mac or even Linux anyway.

Some of the best Be software has been written by a one person development team. Example: Pe, a great code editor. Example: NetPositive: a good and very fast web browser. Example: Robin Hood, a fast, capable, and very easy to configure web server.

BeOS is giving people a chance in the software business they would not have on Windows. As far as I am concerned, this is the best thing I have seen since I have first started using a computer several years ago.

#42 By golly, you're right

by Anon

Thursday August 12th, 1999 7:54 PM

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How could I ever doubt the viability of the BeOS software market when ONE WHOLE PERSON is writing software for it.

Lets see, there is a web browser named NetPositive and a web server named Robin Hood. Yeehaa! Damn, I wish I could invest in this obvious goldmine.

#43 There are companies forming.

by Anon

Thursday August 12th, 1999 8:43 PM

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There are companies forming specializing in just BeOS software and hardware. Beatware, BeMachines, Gobe, and many more.

What does that tell you if one person if capable of writing a piece of software better than a windows counterpart written by a whole team of engineers? Wouldn't you say the operating system you are writing for has something to do with that?

<http://www.infoworld.com/…/reviews/990809beos45.htm>

Imagine what would happen if a larger, motivated team of engineers writes a BeOS app.

#41 umm...

by beg <beg1@netscape.net>

Thursday August 12th, 1999 7:34 PM

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No, i have to disagree.

Before i was a ISP/Browser user and knew how to make web site and stuff i was always intrested in other Online Services. I am by no means an advanced user, but i know how to install a video card or fix a computer if there is a problem.

Before this, i remember when CompuSever would put thier disks in the newspaper. I remember getting these disk and i was always intrested. I was wondering if CompuSever was better than AOL. Well, back then CompuSever wasn't better in my opinion so i stuck with AOL.

But you are right, not everyone will care for these CDs. That's why Netscape must be pre-installed with every computer. Compaq & IBM already do this.

Now they need Dell. I am not sure if Gateway does..

#44 umm...

by danielhill <danielhill@hotmail.com>

Thursday August 12th, 1999 10:05 PM

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Regarding Compaq distributing NSCP, that's because Compaq are very Microsoft-aligned, and they want to make Microsoft look good regarding the unfair monopoly DOJ court case by saying "yes, we can give out Netscape".

#45 Bookmarks

by Jarrad

Thursday August 19th, 1999 11:23 PM

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Please in Netscape 5 could we get an option to alphabetize bookmarks.

Thanks so much..