MozillaZine

Full Article Attached Innovations from Athena Design and Mozilla

Monday April 5th, 1999

Several readers brought to our attention an interesting project being developed using the Mozilla code. Athena Design, located in San Francisco but with developers throughout the US, has developed an intriguing proof-of-concept for "Dynamic DOM Rewriting". What is DDR? Click "Full Article" below to read an interview we conducted with Athena Design's CTO, David Pollak.

If you feel that DDR is important, contribute to the conversation in the layout newsgroup. Read the article to find out more.


#1 Re:Innovations from Athena Design and Mozilla

by Brad Neuberg <bkn3@columbia.edu>

Monday April 5th, 1999 11:04 PM

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I'm very interested in the work that Athena has done using Mozilla to do real-time updating of the client. Is there a way to do this without having to modify the Mozilla source code? I am interested in finding a standards-compliant way of doing this type of 'Real-Time HTML' in the browser. If you notice more and more the browser is kind of turning into a server, in which the HTML server itself can periodically check on to see how things are going and to give and request information. There are many diverse applications of real-time HTML, or any browser application that can dynamically update the nodes of a DOM tree: * chat clients * real-time paging * real-time collaboration

It even gets more interesting when you stop thinking of the nodes on a DOM tree as being HTML elements and rather think of them as being entire components, so that entire components can be moved back and forth from the server to the client. Suddenly, you can create JavaScript mobile-agents merely by having them be a node on the DOM tree, and then moving this node to a server or another browser! Talk about something similar to Java's JINI....

Thanks, Brad Neuberg VP of Technology, BaseSystem Inc. Steward at the OpenPortal Initiative, <http://www.openportal.org> OpenPortal, where websites become discussions, and discussions become websites