MozillaZine

'Houston Chronicle' Raves About Easy, Fun, Fast, Safe, Free Mozilla Firefox

Saturday March 13th, 2004

The Houston Chronicle has an article about Mozilla Firefox, describing the browser as "easy, fun, fast, safe, free". The report highlights Firefox's popup blocking, tabbed browsing, integrated Google search, extensions, download manager, speed and privacy options. Thanks to tityre for telling us about this article.


#72 Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Browser minutae

by jgraham

Wednesday March 17th, 2004 4:37 AM

You are replying to this message

> the author is pretty critical of MathML from the point of view of authoring

That's basically because MathML wasn't designed for authoring; you're much better off using something like itex2MML ( <http://golem.ph.utexas.ed…istler/blog/itex2MML.html> - the page specifically talks about a moveable-type plugin, but the package contains a generic converter and a MT frontend ) in order to author pages in a LaTeX-like language and then convert to MathML as a final step.

One big advantage that MathML has over the hacked-together XHTML + CSS solutions that the authors propose is accessibility - a screenreader will make a complete mess out of a document with lots of <div class="fract-top">a</div><div class="frac-bot">b</div> instances - although they suggest their method is "seperating content from style", what they're actually doing is moving the document semantics into the presentation layer.

That's all a bit tangential to the issue of Opera managing 'pure CSS' renderings of MathML. How well does that work? I can imagine it would suffer from poor typography and limited flexibility - but maybe I am wrong. Can you set up one of the MathML sheets as a user stylesheet and take a screenshot of, say, <http://golem.ph.utexas.ed…~distler/blog/index.shtml> roughly equivalent to <http://golem.ph.utexas.ed…~distler/blog/index.shtml> This may not be the best example in the world, but I'm intereted to see how the CSS solution holds up in real world use.