MozillaZine

Mozilla Firebird Renamed Firefox, Version 0.8 Released

Monday February 9th, 2004

The standalone Mozilla Firebird browser has been renamed to Firefox and received an upgrade to version 0.8. This latest release features a new download manager, bookmarks enhancements, better support for extensions and several thousand other improvements. Windows users can benefit from a new installer, while Mac OS X users will enjoy the new Aqua-style theme, Kevin Gerich and Stephen Horlander's Pinstripe.

Firefox is the browser's third name. The last name, Firebird, drew strong objections from the Firebird database community when it was announced in April. The database community's supporters and commercial backers waged a high-profile campaign against mozilla.org and affiliated parties until mozilla.org announced that Firebird would only be used as a codename. The new Firefox moniker is intended to be used as a permanent product name and a strong brand identity will be built around it. The new name was chosen after extensive international trademark searches and consultations with lawyers. The process of registering Firefox as a trademark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office began in December last year.

Firefox 0.8 can be downloaded from the Firefox product page or direct from the Firefox 0.8 directory on ftp.mozilla.org. Check out the Firefox 0.8 Release Notes for more information.


#101 Re: Firefox and iht.com

by eiseli

Monday February 9th, 2004 11:09 PM

You are replying to this message

It's not a Firefox (or Mozilla problem), it's an iht and IE problem. They say the image with class="photoImage" should have a left padding of 20px. Gecko, the rendering engine of Firefox honours this.

Then they have some tag soup with tables, divs, width of cells defined per html, per css, fixed values, percentages, width set on a colspan cell etc...etc... . If you want to calculate the width one cell should have, then you have several ways to do that, and you will end up with different results. For example, the cell containing the image should be, according to my calculations:

Width of table: undefined

Width of first column (World map): 179 Pixel (given in HTML) / or should it be 203 Pixel given in CSS?

Width of the remaining of the table (colspan=2): 630 Pixel (given in HTML)

Now I can get the width of the table: 179+630 (assuming inline html width has more weight than a more general class) = 809

Cell with the photo (class photoImage): 15% (given in HTML). Percent values are in reference of the table width, thus 809/100*15=121 Pixel

The cell to the right of the photo is: 235 Pixel (given in CSS)

Width of the table: 179+121+235=535 (note that it's almost 300 pixel less large than computed before, so we keep the previous value)

So back to the photo. Its cell is 121 pixel large, the photo itself is 190 pixel large and we also have a left padding of 20 pixel. Which reduces the available size of the cell to 121-20=101 Pixel. Now how on earth do you place a 190 pixel large image into a space which is 90 pixel smaller than that?

That's my understanding. I know I'm not exactly aware how Mozilla computes this mess. But the reason why it's working in IE is because it _happened_ to work because IE understood this mess differently.