MozillaZine

Full Article Attached Roadmap Update: Mozilla Application Suite will be Sustained

Friday January 16th, 2004

Brendan Eich has updated the Mozilla Development Roadmap, adding a note that the Mozilla Foundation has no plans to retire the Mozilla Application Suite in the near future and will continue to release updates to the program, also known as SeaMonkey. This means that users of the Mozilla Application Suite will continue to benefit from changes made to core components such as the Gecko rendering engine and the Necko networking library. However, no major updates are planned for the frontend user interface, as the Foundation still wants to focus innovation in this area on the standalone applications, such as Mozilla Firebird and Mozilla Thunderbird. Sustaining the Mozilla Application Suite will benefit enterprises and other organisations that have standardised on Mozilla 1.x, as well as providing a smooth upgrade path for users of the discontinued Netscape browser and other derivatives of SeaMonkey.

Brendan Eich's newsgroup posting has more details about the Roadmap revision. A major Roadmap overhaul, outlining the path to Mozilla 2.0 and the future of the open Web, is planned for later this month.


#3 Movement from the suite to seperate apps

by pkb351 <pbergsagel@shaw.ca>

Friday January 16th, 2004 7:50 PM

You are replying to this message

"The idea is to move from the over-integrated application suite to simpler toolkit applications, to remove more advanced functionality from the default configurations, but to provide robust tools for building your own browser by layering those extensions that you want to use on top of the base. In an attempt to avoid an explosion of unique builds that have to be supported by mozilla.org, we will likely ship with all of the popular extensions installed but disabled, so that they can be easily turned on by those who wish to use them, and uninstalled by those who don't."

One major reason I use the Seamonky suite over the Firebird/Thunderbird combo is preferences. Its been about 4 months since I test drove Firebird, but I found it lacked too many settings for preferences I wanted to set. You state in the roadmap that "we will likely ship with all of the popular extensions installed but disabled, so that they can be easily turned on by those who wish to use them, and uninstalled by those who don't." I highly agree with this model and strongly feel it should also apply to the preferences. There is a tendency to pare preferences to a minimum set and if a user desires/needs to set a preference not in this "bare bones" set to use about:config. The default setting for a preference does not work for all users every time. At one time the tab setting in Firebird was set to open a new tab each time a link was clicked on with no preference to change it to open the link in the same tab if so desired. This sucked since I am on broadband and links usually open quickly. Users do not need all the preference settings found in about:config, but they do need more settings beyond the bare bones preference panel being promoted. usability for a user often means being able to alter a default behavior in a program. Maybe there should be a heiarchy of preferences:

1. Most often used preferences (the default preference panel). 2. Less often (but still useful) used preferences (opened by clicking on a button located in the default preferences panel.)