MozillaZine

Demise of Netscape Voted Most Significant Mozilla Event of 2003

Sunday January 11th, 2004

Last month, we asked you what you thought was the most significant event for the Mozilla project in 2003. The top choice was the demise of Netscape, which received 35% of the 1,947 votes cast. The launch of the Mozilla Foundation came second, with 29%, followed by the new end user focus (16%) and the new Roadmap (12%). The Firebird naming conflict finished in last place, with only 4% of voters considering it to be the most important event of last year.

For our first poll of 2004, we've picked five of the most popular Mozilla development books and want you to tell us which you think is the best. Choose from the Netscape Mozilla Source Code Guide, Essential XUL Programming, Creating Applications with Mozilla, Creating XPCOM Components or Rapid Application Development with Mozilla and watch the results to see which Mozilla book other readers favour.


#19 Re: Re: explain

by Gnu

Tuesday January 13th, 2004 12:47 AM

You are replying to this message

And you expected what kind of response, exactly? What you did was the equivalent of saying, "Why? Because it's crap."

The kinds of attitudes you describe are perpetuated by a few common Mozilla users; not its developer base, which has always encouraged constructive criticism and pushed to make Mozilla applications more accessable to everyone, not just power users. You'll get those sorts of unflattering attitudes on any big project, particularly in the open-source community. The developers and project leads won't always make decisions that everyone deems prudent, and elevating them to god or devil status belies the fact that they are very human.

The Foundation and Mozilla's core devs have gone a long way in keeping Mozilla's momentum post-Netscape, and it shows little sign of slowing. You seem to suggest that they've gone out of their way to alienate current and future Mozilla advocates, but during the rapid course of transition that Mozilla has been through in the past year, nothing could be closer to fiction.

Of course, one could argue that the source of your ire is that you've had your own comments rudely debunked by a Mozilla developer or two in the past. With respect, seeing the kind of attitude you've shown here, I wouldn't exactly blame them.