MozillaZine

Lindows.com Announces Mozilla-Based Nvu Web Publishing Software

Wednesday October 29th, 2003

Michael Robertson, CEO of Lindows.com, has announced that his company is starting a project to build an easy-to-use Web publishing product for Linux. The new application, called Nvu (pronounced 'N-view'), will be based on Mozilla Composer and released under the Mozilla Public License. Lindows.com has contracted Daniel Glazman of Disruptive Innovations to be the lead developer, though the company hopes to attract other contributors. Version 1.0 of Nvu is expected in the first quarter of 2004. See the Nvu FAQ for more information.


#7 Re: Why not?

by jgraham

Thursday October 30th, 2003 10:34 AM

You are replying to this message

> Lindows has specifically said it will be licences uncer the MPL (which composer currently is), so again, unless I'm missing something it should all be back-portable.

Actually all* the code in the mozilla.org CVS is licensed under a MPL/GPL/LGPL triple license. This is very friendly to embeddors - they can use the code under the terms of the MPL (which does not require derivative works to be open source i.e. they can add non-MPL files, they are just required to contribute back changes to existing files) or under the GPL (so they can link in other GPL code) or the LGPL. However, it creates a problem for Mozilla.org, since, even if the developer open sources all their changes, the license they use doesn't have to be identical to that required for mozilla itself. So Lindows can release all their changes under MPL, but if they don't also license their changes to be used under both GLP and LGPL, those changes can't be folder back into the main tree.

In the absence of further information, I prefer to believe that Lindows is a team player and will allow (most of) their changes back into the main tree; the reference to MPL alone on the website is probably just a lack of clarity on the part of the author. I certianly don't see that forking layout would be at all helpful to them.

*OK maybe not quite all. But that's not the point.