MozillaZine

Mozilla Thunderbird 0.3 Released

Wednesday October 15th, 2003

The third release of Mozilla Thunderbird, the standalone mail and newsgroups client, is now available. Thunderbird 0.3 features better attachment handling, performance improvements (particularly for IMAP users), support for placing your signature above the quoted message text if you prefer to top-post, and a new POP account option to remove read messages from the server after x days.

Mozilla Thunderbird is based on Mozilla 1.5 and can be downloaded from the Thunderbird 0.3 directory on ftp.mozilla.org. The Mozilla Thunderbird 0.3 Release Notes have more details and mozilla.org's new Thunderbird page contains more general information about the program.


#17 Thunderbird

by Ascaris <ascaris1@att.net>

Friday October 17th, 2003 8:24 PM

You are replying to this message

I wouldn't worry about TB being an 0.3. It's just an arbitrary number. I've been using TB as my primary mail client since it was first switched from being Minotaur, and it has been as stable as can be. It has not crashed once on me, not from the pre-0.1 releases all the way up to 0.3... which is better than I can say for Firebird or Seamonkey during the same time. I have had no data loss with TB either. It's much better than its 0.3 version would suggest. As many others have noted, it comes from a mature code base.

I don't miss the features from Outlook Express, because I have never used it (not even when it or its predecessor used to be called Windows Messaging). I have used Netscape for email from the time that I got my first POP3 email account in the mid 90s (was that 3.0 "Gold", if I recall?), and I migrated to Mozilla about the time that 1.0 came out.

The first thing I did when I installed XP on this machine was to delete OE, and IE has been relegated to doing only Windows updates (my firewall won't let it contact any IPs not associated with Windows Update). I've never used IE other than that. Thus, my basis of comparison for browsers and email clients is Netscape 4.xx-- and they compare favorably indeed.

Frank