MozillaZine

'PC Pro' Columnist Recommends Mozilla Firebird

Saturday August 30th, 2003

jgraham writes: "The UK magazine PC Pro has a very positive article about Mozilla Firebird. In particular, the writer praises the fact that Firebird is standalone, and does not provide an unwanted mail client. He also appreciates the ability to add extra functionality through extensions. The article also goes on to mention the Mozilla Amazon Browser, and is enthusiastic about the possibilities offered by XUL based applications."

After a few minutes of browsing the PC Pro site, you'll be asked to register before being allowed to continue (registration is free). This requirement can be avoided by loading each page of the article in a separate tab or window (Mozilla is only discussed on the first three pages), or by disabling cookies. The article can also be found in PC Pro issue 108.


#10 Re: Re: A reality check...

by as265

Sunday August 31st, 2003 7:18 PM

You are replying to this message

I guess I really wasn't very clear.

First of all, I believe that FB already renders every page that I normally visit correctly, so that's not a problem. I suppose it has more to do with the way the one "sets up" FB. Your average PC user will get confused and turned-off by having to install extensions. The idea is great, but the interface is not what most people are used to. The installation routine has to be changed - most vanilla users won't work with unzipping files manually, then, during the installation process, or the first run of FB, most popular extensions should be easilty set up wth a "point and click" kind of routine.

My point was more to making the program more popular by appealing to the average, everyday PC user who doesn't want to tinker with anything. He/she can install software OK, but if you ask him/her to download and unzip a file, they will no-doubt avoid it.

And of course, there's the "fear factor". Telling users that it's a safer browser is one thing, but they need to know what could really happen if they continue to plod along with IE.