MozillaZine

Mozilla 1.4 and Netscape 7.1 News and Reviews

Sunday July 6th, 2003

It's almost a week since the double release of Mozilla 1.4 and Netscape 7.1. The new Netscape version came out first and it was reported on by Slashdot, LWN.net and Macworld UK. Mozilla 1.4 followed shortly after, leading to articles at Slashdot (again), Neowin.net, LWN.net (again), GnomeDesktop.org FootNotes and the Temple of the Screaming Penguin. As the two browsers came out on the same day, several sites — including ZDNet News, Techweb, The Mac Observer and OSNews — produced single reports for both releases. Meanwhile, CNET News.com and Ars Technica tied their stories in with Marc Andreessen's recent comments that browser innovation is dead.

In the reviews department, eWeek examined Mozilla 1.4 (with some comments on the new Netscape version) and The Inquirer took a look at Netscape 7.1.

Finally, for those who think that Mozilla 1.4 doesn't offer any real improvements, Asa Dotzler has a changelog. Thanks to everyone who sent us links to articles.


#10 browser innovation - a visual history?

by napolj2

Tuesday July 8th, 2003 8:56 PM

You are replying to this message

I think the comment about browser innovation had more to do with just navigating the web. I remember reading somewhere some ideas that one of the Netscape designers had for a different browser paradigm. What I think he was getting at was to make a tree-like structure to represent your history as you browsed sites. Each node on the tree would represent a site you visited. The current node would be highlight or a different color. If you just went from one site to another, all the tree would be is a straight line. But if you opened links in new windows/tab, or went back to a previous site and then clicked on a different link, the tree would form a new branch to represent your new path.

We could probably make a Mozilla extension to implement this kind of 'visual history' as a sidebar. It would make it easier to visualize your path if you had been looking at a lot of different webpages at the same time. You could also use this type of tree structure to visualize the links on the current site by showing more branches coming out of the current node of the tree.

With tabs now I don't think there is a real need for something like this, but I still think it would look cool if done right. You could also make a little globe that would, when you moved to a new website, rotate to center on the location of the server and mark it with a star or something. I know this offers no real functionality, but remember what made SETI@HOME so popular among most users what is pretty screen saver, not the excitement over the science or new distributing computing technology behind it.

Any ideas or interest? I'd implement myself, if I just had the know-how and time :)