MozillaZine

Internet Explorer 6 Service Pack 1 to be Final Standalone Version

Monday June 2nd, 2003

Over the last few days, several people have written in with the news that there will be no further standalone versions of Microsoft Internet Explorer. Future enhancements to the browser will only be delivered in the form of operating system upgrades. The news was confirmed by Internet Explorer Program Manager Brian Countryman in a May 7th online chat discussing the changes made to Internet Explorer for Windows Server 2003. He said: "As part of the OS, IE will continue to evolve, but there will be no future standalone installations. IE6 SP1 is the final standalone installation... Legacy OSes have reached their zenith with the addition of IE 6 SP1. Further improvements to IE will require enhancements to the underlying OS." The next consumer version of Windows, codenamed Longhorn, is due in 2005.

Update! According to a CNET News.com article, the standalone version of IE may, in fact, continue to be updated. "If you're using IE now, for Mac or Windows, you will have access to any appropriate updates," the report quotes a Microsoft representative as saying. "There will be continued innovation and improvement... It's not going anywhere as a product. What happens in the Longhorn timeframe — it's too early to discuss."


#1 Not sure what to think of this...

by ksheka

Monday June 2nd, 2003 10:01 PM

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It's possible that with further linking with the OS it'll make IE necessary to do any secure transactions in the future (ie: Digital Rights Management).

On the other hand it means that all users that don't upgrade to Windows Palladium will need to go to alternative browsers (ie: Mozilla, Safari) in order to view web pages that use newer web standards.

Since banks and Web Stores already know that they can use Mozilla safely I think we're good fo the near future.

Only problem is with digital content creators and retailers, who may force Palladium in order to participate in their wares.

#7 Re: Where's general.SmoothScrolling?

by Gunnar

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 1:41 AM

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I am afraid that "newer web standards" won't be the ones set by the W3C unless Palladium backfires badly.

If things turn out wrong, you will not only be required to use IE but also the latest version of Windows (or whatever MS' OS will be called) to do your online shopping, banking,...

#9 Unlikely

by ed_welch

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 2:29 AM

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If they did that they would immediately exclude all MAC users, becuase there will be no IE7 for the MAC.

#12 re: unlikely

by motobass

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 6:36 AM

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That's precisely what it means. Is there an IE6 for Mac? I'm not positive, but I don't think so.

#15 Why do you think Apple went for Safari?

by tjwhaynes

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 8:09 AM

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<p>Apple has probably realised that the rug they are standing on is likely to be pulled away by MS at some point in the future. Safari is a smart move in many respects, not least cutting ties with MS.

#23 Re: Why do you think Apple went for Safari?

by hosking

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 1:05 PM

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I always asumed fute verions of Mac OS will still come with IE as well as Safari Just to keep MS happy.

#26 Why?

by sremick

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 2:46 PM

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Why does Apple need to keep MS happy?

They don't need MS for a browser anymore... they've got Safari (and Mozilla).

MS provides the Apple platform with an office suite, but it doesn't have to be that way:

<http://porting.openoffice…ac/ooo-osx_downloads.html>

All it takes is Apple deciding to do to OpenOffice what AOL decided to do to Netscape/Mozilla: start pouring money into the opensource project due to realization on the return in investment (which in this case is total freedom from MS). Suddenly Apple can include an office suite bundled with Macs without having to roll licensing fees into the base system cost. This would make Macs more attractive to the masses.

Meanwhile, if OO.org got a infusion of cash from Apple it wouldn't necessarily only benefit the OS X port. This could advance the OO project further as a whole and cause OO to take more of a dent even out of the Windows platform.

MS would have something to be worried about, there.

#29 Re: Why?

by hosking

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 4:17 PM

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Well I asumed they would do it so MS would keep making office.

#39 Oh!

by WJTW

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 10:27 PM

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Hmm... is the MacOS department affected by this? I always thought they were separate departments, and the one they mention that would be the final standalone version would be for the Windows version only, since they are actually developed separately by different people?

WJTW

#2 opportunity

by morg

Monday June 2nd, 2003 10:23 PM

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As time marches on, IE will get more and more out of date. This is a giant opportunity for alternative web browsers, and that means us.

With 1.4's NTLM support and its ability to mount home dirs on network drives, 1.4 and Netscape's next release should get a lot of corporate attention. Then, once we transition to Firebird, the product will become even more competitive.

We'll keep fixing bugs, fine-tuning, and adding new features. IE will stagnate.

One thing I really would like to see post-1.4 is crash recovery. That would be huge.

#4 Nice

by jedbro

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 12:19 AM

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"One thing I really would like to see post-1.4 is crash recovery. That would be huge." It's available as an extension for Moz 1.4x (although not working if Firebird yet :( ) <http://recall.mozdev.org/>

cheers!

#24 Re: Nice

by Zpottr

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 2:00 PM

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The Tabbrowser Extensions add-in ( <http://white.sakura.ne.jp…ul/_tabextensions.html.en> ) does the same, and works in Firebird/ Phoenix/ ...

#19 Re: opportunity

by krishy

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 9:28 AM

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Can you just explain what exactly you mean by "ability to mount home dirs on network drives"?

#20 Re: Re: opportunity

by WillyWonka

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 11:03 AM

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I might mean that you can now move your profile to a networked directory such as \\mycomputer\c

That way you can have multiple computers reading the same bookmark file. I could be totally wrong though :)

#21 Re: Re: Re: opportunity

by GAThrawn

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 12:41 PM

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It definitely means that you can have your profile on a networked dircetory connected by a UNC path. Which is great news for moving Moz into the corporate world, as if you use roaming profiles on a Windows based network to ensure that all of your settings and files follow you around the network wherever you login, then Mozilla will also store its settings in your roaming profile on the server.

This means that not just your bookmarks follow you around, but also your mail (if you use Mozilla's mail), your history, your individual settings and with the (relatively) new support for installing extensions into the profile directory now many of your XPI installed extensions can also follow you around.

#28 Are there documents about this?

by jmscott42

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 4:11 PM

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Is there a document (either made, or going to be made) discussing some of these new features supporting roaming profiles? They're definitely impressive, but it'd be nice to see some examples, or at least a "This is how it works" type thing.

#33 Re: Are there documents about this?

by GAThrawn

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 5:55 PM

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It just works" (TM)

No but seriously, I'm talking about using the Windows roaming profile feature, implented using Windows NT4 or Windows 2000 servers, Win NT4, 2000 or XP Pro clients and either an NT domain or an ADS.

The hard work is all done by Windows, but now Mozilla can take advantage of that (whereas what happened was that Mozilla would often refuse to start if you were using a network redirected _windows_ profile directory, or at the very least you couldn't get it to work without some truly painful workarounds) now Mozilla will happily store and retrieve your details from the network redirected folder like any other profile-using native Windows app.

This is roaming your profile around a local network, and definitely isn't the same as having roaming (or synchronising) bookmarks (or address books or full profiles) between different networks and systems, across the internet. That involves either LDAP, or usable FTP servers etc and is the subject of a number of open RFE bugs (one or two of them have been pretty actively worked on by someone at Oeone I think ?Ben?, and I seem to remember that a couple of Netscape engineers have at least looked at it) but I haven't kept up with that effot very lately so I couldn't say how far they've got.

#3 Cool

by wwrafter

Monday June 2nd, 2003 11:09 PM

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Maybe by 2005, IE will block it's first pop-up, and if we're really lucky, it might even have a tabbed interface.

#6 Re: Cool

by arky <silence@silence.tk>

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 12:36 AM

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Well, fortunately we don't have to wait for that anymore.

I hope to see that IE will have other considerable browsers to compete with, seriously. I think and hope for the best that the day when alternative browsers will see a daylight to normal users also. Alternative browsers like Mozilla & opera have already beat the IE with their quality and improvements, it's time to show people why they are here.

#8 Re: Cool

by xander

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 1:45 AM

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What do we need IE for anyways? You can already get tabbed browsing and popup blocking and still be able to use the IE html rendering engine. Avant Browser is freeware and does everything. They even have a Mozilla modern skin for it. :)

<http://www.avantbrowser.com/>

When I "need" to use IE on a picky site, I use Avant. Give it a try...

#10 Re: Re: Cool

by Galik

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 4:20 AM

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But in all the important respects Avant Browser *is* Internet Explorer. The UI maybe different and much better that IE's but it's still locking you into MS web 'standards' that arn't open. This is what MS wants. As long as the rendering engine is IE then MS are happy for people like Avante to do the UI work for them. That way MS still gets to controll the back end and what happend on the servers. MS already owns the desktop market and the server market is what they're after now. IE is one of their main tools. Is it just a coincidense that this anouncement came days after the settlement with AOL? MS now feels it has Cart Blanch to force everyone to use IE rendering engine because whose gonna sue them for unfair competition now?

#40 Re: Re: Re: Cool

by xander

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 3:43 AM

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I agree with you, Microsoft is happy as long as you're using their flawed rendering engine. It definitely sucks! I can't stand IE myself, but the original comments were about if IE will ever get tabbed browsing and popup blocking. So that's what I commented on...

I rarely use IE's rendering engine.. I use Mozilla and Opera 99% of the time.

#5 PNG-a-ling

by sime

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 12:35 AM

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Microsoft still have a problem with providing total PNG support.Copied from the chat:

Host: Rob (Microsoft) Q: when will IE get transparent PNG support?

A: Ian, I'm sorry, I can't answer that question for you

Shame because just recently I understood what alpha-transparency was. I remebered it as an old GIF hazy edge problem with no name. After reading APC <http://www.apcmag.com/apc…30D03E3DECA256D18000F5682> it was made clear (the graphic illustrating it in hard copy version explains it all... but was not put its not online).

#18 Re: PNG-a-ling

by WillyWonka

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 8:36 AM

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You can hack WinIE into displaying png's... check out how <http://www.mozilla.org/start/1.0> does it. It is more effort than it is worth though. IMO IE users can live with the grey squares on my site.

#52 official libpng site

by arsa

Thursday June 5th, 2003 8:04 AM

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official libpng site explains it best, including link to workaround. workaround has some limitations too btw. <a href="<http://www.libpng.org/pub…ngapbr.html#msie-win-unix>">here</a>

#53 official libpng site

by arsa

Thursday June 5th, 2003 8:04 AM

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#54 Re: official libpng site

by WillyWonka

Thursday June 5th, 2003 8:58 AM

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Yeah I ran into the alpha and the gamma problems when making <http://www.mozilla.org/start/1.0> work in IE. Wound up using the DirectX Filters and another image all together to fix the gamma for windows users.

#11 IE is going Mozilla

by diag

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 5:12 AM

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This thing is clear. Now, since they killed Netscape completely, the browser war is over and they are going to drop IE and to relaunch it whith Longhorn as a Gecko- (or maybe even Mozilla-) based browser. So the MS-AOL deal is merely AOL relicensing their own technology.

#36 Re: IE is going Mozilla

by brobinson

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 9:41 PM

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Whatever you're on I need some...

#13 It's what MS has always wanted to do.

by SomeGuy

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 6:36 AM

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As someone who has pulled IE apart this really doesn't surprise me.

The IE installer actually has different binaries of the IE "Core" (html renderer, wininet, etc.) for Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4, Windows 2000, and Windows ME (and Windows XP already has IE 6).

In contrast Mozilla has one binary for Windows 95/98/ME/NT 3.51/NT 4/2000/XP (Yes, as of Mozilla 1.3.1 it still seems to work almost perfectly under NT 3.51!)

Microsoft has already dropped support for Windows 95. They are almost certainly dropping support for NT 4, the last version of windows not to have the windows update feature, making them free now to offer it only via windows update. On a side note, NT 4 was also the last version of windows not to have that awful IE "integrated" shell, so we can now expect more MS applications to make use of these IE "integrated" shell features.

I think since the inclusion of IE 3 in Windows 95 OSR2 this is the kind of integration (packaging wise) MS was after, but then when IE 4 came out they began to aggressively advertise IE as it's own stand-alone product. (remember how the "e" logo was everywhere in IE 4?) Perhaps because people were used to downloading Netscape or possibly other reasons they made IE a separately downloadble product rather than including it with OS service packs. In IE 5 they did change all the installation dialogs to call itself a "Windows update" rather than IE installation. I still laugh at the IE uninstaller on Windows 95 when it always says "reverting to previous version of IE" even when there was no previous version of IE and it is actually uninstalling like a normal application.

#14 Windows Longhorn: Rest In Peace

by geraldb

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 7:27 AM

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I guess Microsoft still needs to learn the Pressplay, Musicnet, and so on lesson. If there's a free alternative that's better and that's free, no one is going to shell out anything to Micro Willy.

Just recently, for example, the Munich city council decided to move 14.000 desktops from Windows to Linux, see the write-up of the story in CNET @ <http://news.com.com/2100-…_3-1010740.html?tag=cd_mh>

Also if you want to get a Media box why not buy a Sony Playstation 3 or a similar box powered by Linux for US$200. Who is going to shell out US$200 for a Longhorn license that only lets you install Micro$oft certified programms. Sure, Michael Eisner (the top duck) will, but who else?

#16 Nothing new

by pcabellor

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 8:19 AM

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I think there are no news here. I never thought Microsoft will stop offering IE, neither stop offering it bundled with Windows. DOJ has granted specific rights to do so now since last years antitrust case resolution.

I would like to see Mozilla leaders pushing not only the Gecko engine but also the browser, and teaming with other open source projects to sinergize: for example, let OpenOffice offer a Mozilla bundled download, offer Kazaa a XUL based UI (if possible); same for Winamp (it's a shame they use IE for minibrowser); and so on.

As for AOL, they're as lost as a rat in a sinking boat: they don't know where to run. They're shooting everywhere and nowhere: Real, WMA?, IE? Netscape?? The truth is they're a media company and will never think as a software company because software doesn't mean visible money for them. The best for all Mozilla communitiy would be that some other company (SUN, IBM) may bought whatever assets or brands Mozilla may have and finance the project with a quantifiable money expectation.

As for Netscape, AOL and Mozilla killed it, let it rest in peace. AOL, because if not even your father trusts you... and Mozilla, because it is and will ever be better than it.

#17 Nothing new

by pcabellor

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 8:25 AM

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I think there are no news here. I never thought Microsoft will stop offering IE, neither stop offering it bundled with Windows. DOJ has granted specific rights to do so now since last years antitrust case resolution.

I would like to see Mozilla leaders pushing not only the Gecko engine but also the browser, and teaming with other open source projects to sinergize: for example, let OpenOffice offer a Mozilla bundled download, offer Kazaa a XUL based UI (if possible); same for Winamp (it's a shame they use IE for minibrowser); and so on.

As for AOL, they're as lost as a rat in a sinking boat: they don't know where to run. They're shooting everywhere and nowhere: Real, WMA?, IE? Netscape?? The truth is they're a media company and will never think as a software company because software doesn't mean visible money for them. The best for all Mozilla communitiy would be that some other company (SUN, IBM) may bought whatever assets or brands Mozilla may have and finance the project with a quantifiable money expectation.

As for Netscape, AOL and Mozilla killed it, let it rest in peace. AOL, because if not even your father trusts you... and Mozilla, because it is and will ever be better than it.

#22 WTF, And AOL want to stick with IE, This is stupid

by hosking

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 12:54 PM

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I sware if I was an ISP i would seriousely think about leaving IE, Waiting for a New OS WTF???? LMFAO

#25 No news here

by Dracos

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 2:34 PM

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From what I've heard in the last year or so, IE development has stopped because a) The old NCSA Mosaic code that IE is based on is now an unmanageable pile of spaghetti, and b) MS is developing a new browser from scratch to be available only to MSN users.

If this new MSN Explorer is released with Longhorn, that makes for some scary possibilities.

#31 rewriting is good

by morg

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 5:16 PM

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If that's true, then it makes the Mozilla Project's decision several years ago to start over look prescient.

#43 prescient or... late.

by leafdigital

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 7:47 AM

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Microsoft already rewrote their engine in IE4 - they were actually ahead of Netscape/Mozilla in making that decision. As I understand it, that rewrite didn't leave much of NCSA Mosaic. (But I guess there must be some as it's still in the about box. Or they just didn't bother removing it.)

Of course, it may be time for another significant rewrite for IE...

--sam

#34 Re: No news here

by GAThrawn

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 6:00 PM

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Now I could be wrong here but hasn't MSN Explorer already been released about a year ago? I'm sure I remember being constantly hassed by Hotmail asking me if I'd like to try it out.

Isn't it just an extremely newbie friendly front-end to IE that attempts to combine MSN Messenger into the same UI, and hides all the complicated things (like the fact that you can actually visit sites that don't have an MS or MSN logo in the corner of their page ;-)

#27 Here is some news

by Wellander

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 4:05 PM

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Hi, By the way there will not be another relase of netscape eaither and if you want the futuer I.E.s You will need to upgrade you O.S.

#35 Re: Here is some news

by GAThrawn

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 6:02 PM

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And that would be why Netscape engineers are talking about polishing up 1.4 ready to rebrand, repackage and release it as the next version of netscape then?

I'm sorry, I know, don't feed the troll!

#30 .

by hosking

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 4:45 PM

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Maybe having a large market share in browsers isnt making MS any money *shrug* seems to me they are giving up, I don't know

#32 Sorry, sir...

by wvh <wouter-mozzine@fort-knox.rave.org>

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 5:24 PM

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You can't fill your fueltank here. If you want fuel, you have to buy a new car.

#37 Microsoft defines 'Monolithic Operating System'

by stephenc

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 10:03 PM

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...post year 2005:

Scene: An older man in your typical office supplies store approaching a young man restocking a shelf with notebook binders. Older man is a clueless computer user. Young man is fresh on summer break from college.

Clueless: "Excuse me, I'd like to upgrade my Microsoft Office?" Clerk without looking: "Um, the new Windows 2005 in aisle three. We'll process your rental agreement at the counter." Clueless: "But I have Office 97 and I just want to upgrade it." Clerk turns, shaking head in disgust: "Ya, aisle three. Remind me to add the obsolete system surcharge when you get back. Really, you 'otta just go home and stick with what you got." Clueless user shuffles away. Clerk mutters quietly, "stupid ol' geezer must think I look like a Linux terrorist or something. Dang it, the BSA rep saw me talking to him. Oh jeez grampa don't look him in the eye, keep walking... Omygod he said hello. I'm screwed. I'm screwed." Clerk reaches into pocket. Cut shot: fire bursts from window of nearby apartment building. Shards of glass spray onlooker in sidewalk below.

Exit scene: Queue background music. Clerk pulls plastic knife and charges BSA rep while screaming. Sound is distorted. Clerk's eyes are wild with hate. Closing focus on clerk. Shock replaces hate as bullets tear gaping wounds in chest. Narrow focus on face. We see clerk mouth "freedom" in a sudden silence as face slides low left. Lose focus and blur. Background music swells. Roll credits.

<Note: see cutting room about moving copyright notice to top of credits>

#38 Microsoft defines 'Monolithic Operating System'

by stephenc

Tuesday June 3rd, 2003 10:05 PM

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...post year 2005:

Scene: An older man in your typical office supplies store approaching a young man restocking a shelf with notebook binders. Older man is a clueless computer user. Young man is fresh on summer break from college.

Clueless: "Excuse me, I'd like to upgrade my Microsoft Office?" Clerk without looking: "Um, the new Windows 2005 in aisle three. We'll process your rental agreement at the counter." Clueless: "But I have Office 97 and I just want to upgrade it." Clerk turns, shaking head in disgust: "Ya, aisle three. Remind me to add the obsolete system surcharge when you get back. Really, you 'otta just go home and stick with what you got." Clueless user shuffles away. Clerk mutters quietly, "stupid ol' geezer must think I look like a Linux terrorist or something. Dang it, the BSA rep saw me talking to him. Oh jeez grampa don't look him in the eye, keep walking... Omygod he said hello. I'm screwed. I'm screwed." Clerk reaches into pocket. Cut shot: fire bursts from window of nearby apartment building. Shards of glass spray onlooker in sidewalk below.

Exit scene: Queue background music. Clerk pulls plastic knife and charges BSA rep while screaming. Sound is distorted. Clerk's eyes are wild with hate. Closing focus on clerk. Shock replaces hate as bullets tear gaping wounds in chest. Narrow focus on face. We see clerk mouth "freedom" in a sudden silence as face slides low left. Lose focus and blur. Background music swells. Roll credits.

<Note: see cutting room about moving copyright notice to top of credits>

#41 Finally!

by johann_p

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 4:36 AM

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Well, Windows was just an overprized, insecure, and unstable extension to IE anyways - so finally IE officially becomes part of it all. BTW, with this move, noone will be able to claim that IE is "free" (as in comes with no cost) any more ...

#42 Unix version

by frogger3d

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 7:47 AM

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So what about the unix versions like the one for HPUX?

#44 Re: Unix version

by AlexBishop <alex@mozillazine.org>

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 8:35 AM

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"So what about the unix versions like the one for HPUX?"

Cancelled ages ago.

<http://www.microsoft.com/unix/ie/default.asp>

Alex

#50 And good riddance to UNIX IE...

by rkl

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 2:53 PM

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I used HP-UX IE 5 and it wasn't a pleasant experience - slow to start up (though Mozilla on HP-UX is equally guilty of that) and the worst thing was the Java - it ran applets in a separate window, which was utterly useless.

It was written using a kludgy Windows <-> UNIX compatibility library, which even went as far as emulating the registry. A horrible port and the reason why I always laughed at people who said "if only we could have IE on Linux" - you'd end up with a dreadful port like the Solaris and HP-UX versions were (and anyway, you can run IE 6 SP1 via Wine if you really, really must - though like most Win apps under Wine, you have to have a Windows partition available with IE installed on that already).

#51 The Latest Nightly

by anand

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 2:57 PM

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Comparing to NS4 on Unix, however, IE5 for HPUX was a big step up :) NS4 was faster, but would core dump so often it was only barely usable. IE5 for HPUX felt like a pig but was much more reliable. Unfortunately, the intranet web developers here love their Javascript and (at the time) no text mode browsers supported it so many pages would be unusable.

#45 Now Microsoft is waffling at this story

by thoffman11

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 9:59 AM

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" Since then, Microsoft has struggled to reconcile Countryman's remarks with promises that current users of the standalone version of IE will be provided with upgrades.

Countryman did not return calls. A Microsoft representative pressed for clarification of Countryman's comments acknowledged that the company did not, in fact, know what it was going to do.

"We don't know what's happening," said the representative. "There are a lot of different options, and it's too early to talk about any of them...Nothing has been decided yet." "

<http://news.zdnet.co.uk/s….html?rtag=zdnetukhompage>

#46 CNET, it's time to wake up

by tomsommer <webmaster@tsn.dk>

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 10:04 AM

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"One possibility is that its removal could benefit makers of standalone browsers, such as Norwegian software company Opera Software (which charges for one version of its browser and gives away an ad-supported one) or Netscape Comminications, a unit of AOL Time Warner."...."But the future of Netscape, as well as the AOL Time Warner-funded Mozilla open-source project, appear clouded, after the media giant's rapprochement with Microsoft, in which AOL threw the weight of its subscriber base behind IE. Many speculate that Netscape's days as an AOL unit are now numbered."

What the fuck? CNET, it's really time to stop messing with mozilla... It's like they have something directly against Mozilla. In every article I've read about browsers they either get the facts wrong or ignore Mozilla as an alternative browser... The fact is that Mozilla is BY FAR better than opera or any other non-IE browser!

#47 Re: CNET, it's time to wake up

by WillyWonka

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 10:50 AM

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Well, they also mentioned mac, but ignored linux. I guess they only like groups of two. Or they just choose to ignore open source software as being viable.

#48 Re: Re: CNET, it's time to wake up

by tomsommer <webmaster@tsn.dk>

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 2:41 PM

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I think we all know by now, that opensource is here to stay, and will grow... It is a BIG part of the future

All we need is to make those bigshot reporters realize it :)

BTW, is opera opensource?

#49 Re: Re: Re: CNET, it's time to wake up

by WillyWonka

Wednesday June 4th, 2003 2:50 PM

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No it's not.

#56 n/a

by ndebord

Saturday June 14th, 2003 1:32 PM

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Well, the window of opportunity for Mozilla, aka FireBird, has opened a bit wider with this confusion over the future of a standalone IE. Since my bank used Netscape and only later moved over to IE, I've had no problems using Mozilla 1.3.1, Netscape 7.02, FiredBird 0.6 and K-Meleon 0.7, SR1 with it and most other financial institutions.

N

#55 CNET = ZDNET = MSNBC = MICROSOFT

by watchman

Friday June 6th, 2003 3:41 PM

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CNET = ZDNET = MSNBC = MICROSOFT

Microsoft is also one of the big money-feeders of the republican party.

What money can buy...