MozillaZine

Tree Branches for 1.2

Tuesday November 5th, 2002

The main Mozilla development tree has branched for 1.2 Final. The trunk is now open to checkins for 1.3 Alpha. Checkins to the 1.2 branch will remain controlled by drivers@mozilla.org. See bug 174647 to track the bugs that drivers consider important to the success of Mozilla 1.2. You can check the latest status of both the branch and trunk by using tinderbox. As always, refer to the Roadmap for the lowdown on mozilla.org's release plans.


#1 Phoenix vs. Mozilla

by Chewey

Wednesday November 6th, 2002 6:46 AM

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This is why I don't like Phoenix. The Mozilla trunk is moving along nicely and producing great Internet clients. But now we have Phoenix in the mix.

Don't get me wrong - I am using v0.4 and *like* it, but what we have are parallel development teams splitting resources, duplicating functionality. For example - popup blocking. I prefer the popup mechanism of Mozilla, but Phoenix is intent on doing it differently. Should we have different mechanisms?

And what is the main Mozilla build Phoenix is derived from?? How often do they go back to the trunk and take advantage of the fixes?

Look, I'm not trying to be a wet blanket here, the UI customisations in Phoenix are excellent, and the Phoenix themes (I'm using Qute) are better than the Mozilla ones, but isn't Phoenix hurting us in the long run?? Other than the separation of the browser from the rest of the applications, what is Phoenix providing us that can't be done as part of Mozilla?

Andy

#3 Re: Phoenix vs. Mozilla

by andred

Wednesday November 6th, 2002 7:49 AM

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>And what is the main Mozilla build Phoenix is derived from?? How often do they go > back to the trunk and take advantage of the fixes?

Phoenix is always built on top of the Mozilla trunk, so they take advantage of almost all the changes right away. The only areas where they don't take advantage of the fixes are the areas where they have completely forked.

#4 Re: Phoenix vs. Mozilla

by Chewey

Wednesday November 6th, 2002 8:39 AM

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OK - that's good to know. One less thing to worry about. :)

Andy

#5 Re: played with it today.....

by Blake <blaker@netscape.com>

Wednesday November 6th, 2002 4:18 PM

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I don't understand how Phoenix could possibly be hurting anything. If there were no Phoenix, there'd be no Phoenix, and Mozilla would be exactly the same as it is now.

By the way, what other popup controls do you want that Phoenix doesn't offer (Phoenix lets you block all sites and unblock ones that require popups to work properly)?

#6 Re: played with it today.....

by Chewey

Wednesday November 6th, 2002 4:46 PM

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Sorry - it's not hurting anything (except possibly adding to the confusion for Joe/Jane User who has not idea what the heck a browser is, just get them the hell on the Internet types).

Like I said - I like Phoenix. But I kind of wish the effort being used as a derivative of Mozilla was being used on Mozilla itself. My biggest fear (that it was being built on an old codebase) was allieviated earlier, so I'll just shut-up now. :)

As for the pop-ups, for some reason I find the Mozilla version easier to use (I tried unblocking a site using Phoenix and it kept insisting I wanted it blocked).

Anyway, I'll stop now. Thanks for clearing things up folks.

Andy

#7 Parallel development of multiple product versions

by tepples <tepples@spamcop.net>

Thursday November 7th, 2002 6:36 PM

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> what we have are parallel development teams splitting resources, duplicating functionality.

Is that always a bad thing? It's not uncommon in software firms to have separate teams working on different versions of a product. For instance, while IE 3 was in development, Microsoft had teams already working on IE 4 and IE 5. I see Phoenix, Thunderbird, and the like as forming the foundation for a push toward Mozilla 2.0.

#2 Let 1000 browsers bloom

by johann_p

Wednesday November 6th, 2002 7:18 AM

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I do not have a problem with the fact that the architecture of mozilla makes it easy to develop "custom" browsers. I prefer Mozilla too, and I sure would like everybody to invest their time in making Mozilla better than writing yet another browser. But: I dont pay them, so they are free to invest their time in whatever they prefer. And, maybe even more importantly: other browsers often come intoexistence because developers want to do things differently than in Mozilla. Since I like most (NOT all :) ) of what has been done in Mozilla, I would not WANT these people to throw away feature to clean up the interface and things like that. And they probably would not have wanted to do it the Mozilla-way. I am happy to see them do it with their own software and if they come up with something that is worth backporting to Mozilla from the Mozilla's perspective, even better. And if they come up with a browser that in the end is even better than Mozilla in some situations - even more better. So the bottomline is: good to have a choice, better to have a bigger choice.