MozillaZine

Mozilla 0.9.6 Released

Tuesday November 20th, 2001

mozilla.org today made available for download binaries of the Mozilla 0.9.6 Milestone. The builds are available on the releases page, or you can get them directly from the ftp site.

New to this milestone are fixes for about 1,600 bugs including support for site icons in both the url bar and tabs (expect IE's favicons to show up in 0.9.7), displaying both Windows Bitmap (.bmp) and Windows Icon (.ico) files inline on all platforms, a new print preview implementation, Page Setup improvements on the Macintosh, Mail message 'labels' (Correction: This feature is not fully complete, only parts of the backed have landed.), and a new select and search context menu item, among others. If you are interested in more information on any of these new features, be sure to check out the release notes.

Also, mozilla.org last week released the source code on which Netscape 6.2 was based.


#198 Mozilla vs Amaya

by JayeshSh <JayeshSh@netscape.net>

Sunday November 25th, 2001 3:31 AM

You are replying to this message

Hello all,

I tried Amaya once and uninstalled it in about an hour. I agree with the post that said Amaya may be very standards compliant but unusable for the end-user.

My first impressions of Amaya were not good at all. Maybe it deserves a second look, and maybe my judgements were too hasty. But this brings up another point: that there is a point to all of Mozilla's "features" - i.e. the password manager, good bookmark management, cookie management, the composer, the mail client, and so on. The reason these "features" exist is that they enhance the browsing experience,and make browsing more pleasant. One reason I don't use K-Meleon is that it is too bare, too grey. And hey - I am not using some spiffy, super-fast machine that can afford to run badly written and slow software. So, the "K-Meleon is faster" argument does not work for me. I don't care how fast a browser is if it does not make my life easier. This post is not against K-Meleon; it is meant to show that to make a "useable" browser, you need more than standards compliance and speed. It has to make the browsing experience easier. And if it looks pretty too, well then you've got a Mozilla!

- Jayesh