MozillaZine

Links Toolbar Landed

Wednesday October 3rd, 2001

Gervase Markham writes: "The Links Toolbar from bug 87428 has finally landed, bringing us ever-closer to full support for HTML 2.0. You'll see it in this morning's builds. The auto-show is still in development over in bug 102832. Good places to try it out are Bugzilla buglists, the W3C, htmlhelp.com and many machine-generated manuals or documents, such as the GNU Make manual."


#51 Re: maybe not the point?

by jcf76 <jfleshman@hotmail.com>

Thursday October 4th, 2001 7:36 PM

You are replying to this message

You're right; very few sites use it now. And no browser has really supported it before. Now that the people who've grabbed builds from the 3rd have seen it; a lot of us want it. I've started adding <LINK> tags to my personal site and plan on adding them to client sites now that there's a browser that supports more than just adding stylesheets. It's a very useful augmentation to a site's existing navigation, and I hope the Mozilla programmers get it reactivated as quickly as they can.

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Having said all that, I agree that it should be shut off for now. Adding 5% to an already-slow program's start time is a Bad Idea. As to the 95% "shitty" code, a lot of it probably predates the current review process. Bad, slow code is why multiple people need to eyeball a patch before it gets checked in. The Mozilla crew has already re-written some bad code (imglib2, aka libpr0n; the new cache; etc) to make Mozilla faster.

The problem with the old code is that someone needs to look through it carefully as it runs and file bugs where optimization can be done. I don't see that being the most exciting way to contribute to the project, and I don't think I would do it myself even if I had the programming skills.

Can someone In The Know tell us what we can do if we just have a gut feeling that the browser is slow because of XYZ? We shouldn't just go filing bugs that say "Uh, I think this part's slow, or something" but it might be useful to get a better-trained person to look at a potentially problematic chunk of older code.

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