MozillaZine

Links Toolbar Landed

Wednesday October 3rd, 2001

Gervase Markham writes: "The Links Toolbar from bug 87428 has finally landed, bringing us ever-closer to full support for HTML 2.0. You'll see it in this morning's builds. The auto-show is still in development over in bug 102832. Good places to try it out are Bugzilla buglists, the W3C, htmlhelp.com and many machine-generated manuals or documents, such as the GNU Make manual."


#110 Re: Re: Re: Cascading Bookmarks Possible?

by Ugg

Saturday October 6th, 2001 11:06 AM

You are replying to this message

Strauss, isn't that axe sharp YET?

>> No software project of medium or large size can achieve a stable release without eventually declaring a moratorium on cool new ideas and just stabilizing what's already done. <<

It's true that this statement reflects good project management in general, but let's face it: what you're really saying is "(Mozilla can't) achieve a stable release without eventually declaring a moratorium on cool new ideas and just stabilizing what's already done (and it has not done so)," and this simply isn't true. For one thing there have been numerous freezes made while stabilization takes place; do you even have a clue what the milestones were FOR? Did you suppose they were just a publicity stunt?

More damning to your claims is the fact that Mozilla has, in fact, released a lot of stable code. Third parties have released stable browsers based on Mozilla code. Public forums and news outlets have proclaimed that It Was So. I'm not sure what "Mozilla" your complaints address, but it doesn't seem to be the one that this site reports on.

Lastly, I would suggest that your suggestion that Mozilla be managed exactly like any other major software project is narroe-minded and short-sighted. Traditional commercial software houses are focused on sporadic, closed-source releases, while any incremental improvements are usually unscheduled and released only as bug patches. By contrast, Mozilla doesn't seem to have any specific stopping point; even the push for 1.0 seems to be more symbolic than anything. It doesn't make sense to have Mozilla completely stop for weeks or months at a time, during which many of its developers are simply told "sorry, you can write it, but we're not interested until Christmas, and that's all there is to it."

Please, go off and cut down some trees now. I think we've all heard enough.