MozillaZine

mozilla.org Releases 0.9.2.1

Tuesday August 14th, 2001

mozilla.org today released the source code for 0.9.2.1, which is the code that matches Netscape 6.1. This comes from the 0.9.2 branch, and is being made available both as part of the MPL license requirement, and as a way for third parties to easily use it to write compatible plugins and addon features to Netscape 6.1, as well as Mozilla.


#30 Standards, customization, and more

by jsgremlin <joshua@bluestarstudio.com>

Friday August 17th, 2001 8:49 AM

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For starters, Mozilla supports much more of the CSS and DOM standards than any other browser. This is really important for developers and anyone who wants nifty, quick-loading web pages or awesome web applications in the browser.

Mozilla gives power to the user in ways other browsers don't. You don't need some third party cookie manager, and you don't need Gator to fill in your forms (and steal you personal info); it's all built-in to Mozilla. Doubleclick has nothing on me, 'cause their cookie is deleted and will never be allowed again. If you pop the hood and start poking around in the .js files, there's a whole bunch more of customizeablitity just waiting for a UI - like selective control over access to javascript functions (any sites you'd like to block from popping-up windows?).

Mozilla is also the only major browser with support for user style sheets and alternate stylesheets (the UI needs some improvement, but it's usable now).

Of course, mozilla also has some nifty themes.

You can use Mozilla for building applications. As I already mentioned, standards support makes Mozilla a great target for in-browser applications. But you can also embed mozilla in windows applications, just like embedding MSIE. Unlike IE, however, Mozilla itself can serve as a cross-platform application framework. For example, Komodo is an IDE built on mozilla.

Mozilla is much safer than IE and Outlook, and not just because it's not the majority browser: Microsoft's scripting and ActiveX models are in themselves unsafe.

Plus, using Mozilla makes you a part of one of the niftiest open-source projects out there. And lizards are cool.