MozillaZine

Mozilla 0.9.2 Released

Friday June 29th, 2001

mozilla.org released milestone 0.9.2 today, which many at mozillaZine believe to be the best candidate for a 1.0 release yet, from an end user point of view. New items since 0.9.1 include 25 more top crash bugs fixed (as measured by Talkback) along with a new context sensitive help system, a new view source window, and a new preloader for windows called 'Turbo'.

You can find Macintosh, Linux, and Windows builds on mozilla.org's releases page, as well as updated release notes.

Following 0.9.2 are two releases, 0.9.2.1, which will be taken from Netscape's branch after they complete their release from it, and 0.9.3 which will be taken from a branch off the trunk, and will not be under the same drivers checkin control, as previously reported.


#43 Not necessarily....

by bcwright <bcwright@ix.netcom.com>

Saturday June 30th, 2001 12:46 PM

You are replying to this message

Not so fast. X11 is a network based protocol, in principle there can be a couple of context switches involved in sending a graphics command to the X server and getting the response (Yes, I know commands can get buffered, it depends a lot on whether the call requires a round trip or not). There can be something of an art to getting good performance out of X since it requires getting rid of as many round trips as possible.

If the X display is local, it is possible to write an Xlib that goes through some kind of shared memory area or a pipe rather than a TCP network connection. It would also be possible to write an Xlib that could eliminate the context switches altogether if it detected that the display was local, and write directly to the screen buffer, though depending on the display architecture this is likely to be unsafe.

Some X implementations do have optimizations of this type, but not all do; we'd have to know the versions of Xlib and the X server in use on the machine in question. Also I don't know if Mozilla on Linux is linked statically with Xlib or with a shared library - this would limit what optimizations an X server could do.

Bruce