MozillaZine

Full Article Attached Towards Mozilla 1.0

Tuesday June 26th, 2001

Gervase Markham recently posted his feelings on what a 1.0 release of Mozilla would be. Gerv has sent us the follow-up to that posting, including much of the feedback he received. To read it, click the full article link. Once you have read through it, we welcome you to post your feelings on what you think a 1.0 release would have. [As Gerv says, please don't post your favorite list of bugs, only the criteria for choosing what bugs to fix.]


#254 Releases.

by jelwell

Monday July 9th, 2001 7:30 PM

You are replying to this message

From the Mozilla at One page: <http://www.mozilla.org/mozilla-at-one.html>

Under "Lowlights and Debatable Decisions", Mozilla.org addresses their change of plans - that some say cost the organization 3 years (not I).

"Netscape and mozilla.org could have proceeded on the original plan to release "Mozilla Classic," i.e., a version of Mozilla using the original Communicator 5.0 source code, instead of rewriting Mozilla using the new NGLayout HTML layout engine (a major component of the new Gecko technology). This might have produced an official 5.0 release sooner and (as a side effect) resulted in having much earlier a relatively stable code base buildable by more developers; however this would have been at the cost of having a level of standards compliance not much above that of the Communicator 4.x releases."

It's apparant that Mozilla.org had other plans, that they did not follow through on. How much of those plans involved promises, either direct statements or by continually parading around release date talk does not matter. What matters, to me, and to many others. Is the promise we all felt, and sometimes still feel for Mozilla. As you seem to feel a need to nitpick my words, I looked up 'promise' for you:

2 : reason to expect something <little promise of relief>; especially : ground for expectation of success, improvement, or excellence <shows considerable promise>

Many people expected something, if only because Mozilla.org existed; but quite undeniably because members of Mozilla.org believed sometimes silently, sometimes thoughtfully, and sometimes loudly in it too. Joseph Elwell.