MozillaZine

Full Article Attached Towards Mozilla 1.0

Tuesday June 26th, 2001

Gervase Markham recently posted his feelings on what a 1.0 release of Mozilla would be. Gerv has sent us the follow-up to that posting, including much of the feedback he received. To read it, click the full article link. Once you have read through it, we welcome you to post your feelings on what you think a 1.0 release would have. [As Gerv says, please don't post your favorite list of bugs, only the criteria for choosing what bugs to fix.]


#207 Let me explain this slowly

by gwalla <gwalla@despammed.com>

Friday June 29th, 2001 1:22 PM

You are replying to this message

You still don't understand the GNKSA. It's not meant to prevent spammers (no software can prevent somebody from being a complete ass if they really want to be). It's to prevent newbies from making common mistakes that irritate the rest of the USENET community.

And if you'd paid attention, you'd have seen that I had already posted a couple of comments to that bug. Hell, I submitted the bug for minimal compliance.

Your example is pointless. Those would be different groups of engineers anyway, so fixing one would not mean not fixing the other.

Finally, I think people would be somewhat miffed (actually, some people already are, if you read the comments in that bug) if their newsreader refused to post a crossposted message for no legitimate reason (which is what the "overzealous blocking of crossposts" bug is about).

As for "users don't care", here's a non-USENET example of why user interest isn't the only criterion for a good feature: think of the favicon.ico feature of IE. Whenever a user bookmarked a site, IE would send a request to the server for a file called "favicon.ico", which it would use as an icon next to the page title in the favorites menu. Users thought it was kinda nifty, if they noticed at all. Server admins, however, were pissed because their servers were being bombarded with requests for "favicon.ico" files, which frequently didn't exist, and it was eating up their bandwidth. The problem wasn't that it ruined the user's experience, the problem is that it caused problems for *other people*.

The GNKSA is about promoting news software that doesn't cause problems for other people.